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I had the privilege of working with Max when I was a post-doc student in the 1980s at UNSW. He was a fascinating person, with so many tales of growing up in Australia and adventures he had in mining etc. We used to spend every lunchtime doing the cryptic crossword puzzle and showing off the breadth of our education. I was lucky enough to see him one time when I went back on a short visit to UNSW after moving to California. It was lunchtime.."Let's do the crossword, " he said reaching for the SMH.

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Rob Solomon
9 years ago

Max worked with my father as they learned to be metallurgists, he then trained me as an undergraduate and finally very patiently supervised me as a PhD student. I have only just learned of Max's passing but it was only two weeks ago sharing with my daughter the quality of Max's tutoring and mentoring as she has begin to study metallurgist's (she actually remembers visiting the professor big old house when she was about 4 years ald). So three generations say thankyou for the memories and character of a wonderful mentor, scholar and role model. Rob Solomon

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David Gore
10 years ago

Max was my thesis supervisor in 1970 when I attempted to recreate the Santa Catherina meteorite to try and replicate the internal oxidation present in this meteorite. This meteorite was unique in having oxidation far deeper than that predicted by existing knowledge given the time between it landing on Earth and discovery of the oxidation. This gave rise to speculation that the meteorite having been in contact with oxygen elsewhere in space. Unfortunately, my synthetic meteorite did not reproduce the Santa Catherina oxidation and my hope of being part of a momentous discovery was dashed. However, a possible explanation for the accelerated oxidation process was proposed. Max gave me encouragement, advice and, above all, education and experience that benefited me greatly in my subsequent careers in Metallurgy and business. He was a role model worthy of emulation and this is reflected in the respect he gained from academia and students alike. Vale Max and may he find a patch of wilderness to reflect on his achievements. The world and certainly I have benefited from his life.

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Tony Malin
10 years ago

I have known Max since 1950, firstly at Defence Standards Laboratories and later at the University of New South Wales, as Research Scientist, Lecturer and Professor. He was a keen bush walker, lover of nature and travel, a fierce competitor in academic pursuits and the sporting field and enjoyed writing and literature. In his field of speciality, the world standing he achieved is attributed as much to these characteristics as to his knowledge and expertise. To me he was a friend, mentor and colleague, always willing to help and offer advice for which I am truly grateful. Tony Malin.

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Tony Malin
10 years ago

I have known Max since 1950, firstly at Defence Standards Laboratories and later at the University of New South Wales, as Research Scientist, Lecturer and Professor. He was a keen bush walker, lover of nature and travel, a fierce competitor in academic pursuits and the sporting field and enjoyed writing and literature. In his field of speciality, the world standing he achieved is attributed as much to these characteristics as to his knowledge and expertise. To me he was a friend, mentor and colleague, always willing to help and offer advice for which I am truly grateful. Tony Malin.

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My first full-time employment was as secretary to Professors Max Hatherly and Professor John Bowles, in the then Department of Metallurgy at UNSW. He was always a kind boss, and I appreciated his slightly wicked sense of humour back then. I was only 17 at the time, and remember how shocked he was at my complete ignorance of the "QVB" when he returned to the office with a small, green-coloured piece of metal and was completely exhilarated that it was from this QVB ... ever since that time, I've thought of Max Hatherly each and every time I've visited the Queen Victoria Building (which happens to now be one of my favourite places!) Fond memories ...

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Arthur Harvey
10 years ago

In 1955 Max Hatherly together with three colleagues, founded 'Metlabs', the first, privately owned, commercial testing & inspection business in Australia. In 2005 Max & Lorna were special guests at the 50th anniversary of Metlabs. Over the intervening years there were many Metlabs employees who recognised the courage & foresight that was necessary to start Metlabs and who would now want their appreciation recorded and their condolences forwarded to Max's family.

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